• Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
REVIEW
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 109-116

Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase: Biology, role in cancer, and novel drug target


1 Instituto De Biomedicina De Sevilla (IBIS) (HUVR, CSIC, Universidad De Sevilla), Sevilla, Spain; Ciber De Cáncer; Department Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center For iPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA) Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
2 Instituto De Biomedicina De Sevilla (IBIS) (HUVR, CSIC, Universidad De Sevilla), Sevilla, Spain; Ciber De Cáncer, Center For iPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA) Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amancio Carnero
Instituto De Biomedicina De Sevilla/HUVR/CSIC, Hospital Universitario Virgen Del Rocio, Avda. Manuel Siurot S/n, 41013, Sevilla, Spain

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ctm.ctm_20_18

Rights and Permissions

The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pool is an important electron exchanger in tumor biology. The salvage pathway plays an important role in the regulation of the levels of cellular NAD+ biosynthesis and the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway. Thus, NAMPT plays a key role in the levels of the NAD+ pool. NAMPT levels in several types of cancer, both solid and hematological cancers, are found to be high compared to the normal tissue. In these tumors, NAMPT overexpression induces an increase in tumorigenic properties. Increased transcription levels of NAMPT result in an increased rate of growth, resistance to cell death, and epidermal-to-mesenchymal transition imparting cancer stem cell-like properties in tumorigenic cells. Main stemness signaling pathways such as Notch, Hippo, Sonic, and Wnt are associated with increased NAMPT transcription levels. NAMPT-induced oncogenic phenotype is also associated with worse prognosis and resistance to therapy in human tumors. Therefore, NAMPT could be an interesting enzyme to consider as probable therapeutic target.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed117    
    Printed6    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded60    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal